Ace Restoration and Waterproofing Incorporated ACE Restoration & Waterproofing Incorporated
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"The Concrete Restoration Experts" shim-white shim-white slogan
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Recent Projects

Featured Projects

Naval Air Station

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shim_trans  Summery
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shim_trans  Objective
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shim_trans  Project Background
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shim_trans  Scope of Work
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shim_trans  Bravo 25 Description
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shim_trans  Overview
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arrow_right  Crane Rail Removal
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shim_trans  Loss of Transverse
 Negative Moment
 Capacity over the
 Outboard Crane Rail
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shim_trans  Concrete Repair
 Materials
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shim_trans  Top Deck
 Repair Procedure
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shim_trans  Under Deck Repairs
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shim_trans  Cathodic Protection
 System
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shim_trans  Cathodic Protection
 System Installation
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shim_trans  Grout Resistivity
 Measurements
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shim_trans  Reinforcing Steel
 Lead Wire Installation
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shim_trans  Upgrade Reinforcement
 Introduction
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shim_trans  Analysis of Bravo-25
 Load Response
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shim_trans  Calculation of
 Bravo 25 Resistence
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shim_trans  Modes of Failure
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shim_trans  Bravo 25
 Upgrade Design
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shim_trans  Concrete Surface
 Preparation
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shim_trans  Embedded
 Reinforcement
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shim_trans  Wet Lay-up
 Composite Laminate
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shim_trans  Proof Tests using
 Impact Load Method
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shim_trans  Costs
 Acknowledgements
 References
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Turbine Deck Load Capacity Restored


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Home > Featured Project > Pearl Harbor

Featured Project

 

Crane Rail Removal

The outboard crane rail (the rail nearest the curb) was removed to accommodate sufficient anchorage length for the transverse composite reinforcement in the curb slab. Details of the rail connection to the deck were unknown prior to the project (as-built drawings did not exist). As the contractor removed asphalt and uncovered the rails, we found 1-inch (2.5 cm) diameter anchor bolts at 30 inches on center holding the rail between Bents 177 and 189 (west end) and 18 inches on center between Bents 216 and 225 (east end). The contractor cut the anchor bolts and removed the rail section. Below the rail was a continuous bearing plate on the east end and 6-inch by 12-inch (15 cm by 30 cm) plates at 30 inches (75 cm) on center on the west end. The steel plates and anchor bolts were left in place. The plates were set on a 2-inch deep bedding of concrete mortar containing ¾-inch (2 cm) aggregate. The bedding was disbonded from the substrate and had to be removed over the length of the east end. A 1-inch (3 cm) deep cut was made in the concrete 1 inch (3 cm) back from the edge of the rail slot. The walls of the slot were then “chiseled” out with a jackhammer to provide a rough surface to bond with the repair material (Figures 13 and 14). An additional 112 ft2 (10.5 m2) of delaminated concrete was removed from the deck adjacent to the rail.

 

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Figure 13. Removing unsound concrete adjacent to outside rail slot (removed).

 

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Figure 14. Typical concrete removal from edge walls of rail slot.

 

Several concrete repairs that had been completed 3 years earlier (1996) did not securely bond to the substrate and had to be removed. Disbonding of these repairs was discovered while removing adjacent concrete. Although the 15-pound (7.3 kgm) jackhammers disclosed additional areas of delaminated concrete, they are too small to cause the delaminations. The jackhammer size was specifically limited to preclude damage to sound concrete and their use was appropriate.

 

Almost 40 percent additional unsound concrete was removed from the top of the deck than originally estimated by condition assessment, which resulted in additional expense to the Government and delays in the project. NFESC extensive site investigations prior to the project were unable to disclose all the unsound concrete. This experience emphasizes the common complaint in the Navy and industry that existing non-destructive methods are not adequate to predict the extent of unsound concrete.

 

Concrete removal on the underside proceeded similarly to that on the top of the deck using saw cut perimeters and 15-pound (7.3 kgm) pneumatic hammers. Repairs made in 1996 used a “form and pump” method that extended the surface outward by about 2 inches (5 cm) (Figure 7). Several protruding patches that interfered with the installation of cathodic protection and external reinforcement were removed. In addition, previous “flush” repairs were disbonded from the concrete substrate. Built-up repair patches totaling 56 ft2 (5.2 m2) were chipped approximately 1/2 inch (1 cm) below flush with the prevailing surface with a jackhammer. The contractor removed 24 ft2 (2.2 m2) of previous “flush” repair areas that were disbonded.

 

Abandoned pipes and other utility lines were removed in preparing the underside of Bravo 25. The contractor encountered no asbestos.

 

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ACE Restoration & Waterproofing, Inc.
620 E. Walnut Ave.
Fullerton, CA 92831
714.526.7366
Fax: 714.526.7965

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  ACE Restoration and Waterproofing Quick Service Overview:
  Concrete repair; concrete restoration, structural upgrade, epoxy injection,
  waterproofing, and more concrete technologies in Fullerton California (CA)
  by ACE Restoration and Waterproofing.

  Concrete Repair, Concrete Restoration, Epoxy Injection, Waterproofing

http://www.acerestoration.net/

 

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